Personalized cancer vaccines now possible due to discovery of cancer frameshift neoantigens
Researchers from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute demonstrated experimental proof-of-concept that cancer mutations produce individual neoantigens, or newly formed antigens, and can be used for cancer vaccines. The new paper published in Scientific Reports on October 2, shows that neoantigens can be used to protect against cancer. Read More
Bacteria use 'poisoned arrowheads' to defeat competition, similar to antibiotics
According to a new study published in Cell Reports on October 1, bacteria use weapons to vanquish their competitors. Researchers at Imperial College London have uncovered a novel weapon that bacteria employ which has a similar mechanism of action as common antibiotics. Read More
Understanding bacterial motility using cryogenic electron microscopy
A new finding reported in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology on October 1 shows how bacterial transmit motion from an inner motor to an outer tail through a flexible joint in the flagellum. This hook helps researchers understand how bacteria move and allows them to improve therapies against bacterial infections. Read More
Viral geometry mystery solved, or at least they have a theory
A new theory, published in Nature Communications on September 27, accurately predicts the positions of proteins within icosahedral (twenty-sided) protein containers of viruses. Researchers at the University of York in the UK and San Diego State University in the US state that this discovery revolutionizes scientific understanding of how viruses form, evolve and infect hosts. Read More
Form-switching bacteria may cause antibiotic resistance
For the first time, scientists have confirmed that bacteria can change forms to avoid being targeted by antibiotics in the human body. Researchers from Newcastle University used state-of-the-art technology to identify bacteria with this unique characteristic. They show, in a study published in Nature Communications on September 26, that these bacteria can survive without a cell wall, potentially leading to antibiotic resistance. Read More
Super-resolution imaging characterizes individual synaptic proteins
It is now possible to rapidly image synaptic proteins at high-resolution thanks to a new technique developed by researchers at MIT and the Broad Institute of Harvard. Details of the technique which use fluorescent nucleic acid probes to label different proteins are described the September 26 Nature Communications article. Read More
New synthetic vaccine fights infectious disease with assistance from the data cloud
A new synthetic vaccine developed by researchers at the University of Bristol and the French National Centre for Scientific Research can be stored at warmer temperatures due to an engineered scaffold design. The details of the Chikungunya vaccine candidate are published in Science Advances on September 25. Read More
New research helps scientists understand the genetic cause of immune disease
Research published in Nature Genetics on September 23 helps narrow down the search for molecular drivers for immune disease which could result in the identification of new drug targets and development of new therapies illnesses such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, and arthritis. Read More
Exploring new tools with class 1 CRISPR systems
A biomedical engineering collaboration between researchers at Duke University and North Carolina State University explores new frontiers of CRISPR technology utilizing the less well-known class 1 CRISPR system. The study was published in Nature Biotechnology on September 23. Read More
New research suggests circular RNAs are important for cardiac healing
Researchers from the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University describe how circular RNA fills a critical role during tissue repair after heart attacks, due to a unique ability to absorb harmful molecules. The study was published September 20 in Nature Communications. Read More
Connect
Science Advisory Board on LinkedIn
Science Advisory Board on Facebook
Science Advisory Board on Twitter