Detecting HPV in women is improved with the aid of a new molecular approach
A new technique called HPV RNA-Seq can provide a second-line test in HPV-positive patients to reduce unnecessary colposcopies and even be used as a two-in-one test combining HPV typing with triage capabilities. Researchers from Institut Pasteur and the Pathogen Discovery Laboratory in Paris, France published their findings in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics on August 12, 2019. Read More
Large-scale analysis of microbiome reveals new classes of small proteins with implications in drug discovery
Trillion of bacteria reside within our bodies, and scientists are just scratching the surface of understanding the microbiome. Researchers at Stanford School of Medicine have shed light on previously unidentified proteins that may have an important role in human health and advance drug development. Read More
Thermally stable TB vaccine may now be possible thanks to an innovative new process
Researchers at the University of Bath have developed a process that protects vaccines from heat damage by trapping them in silica cages. The results were published in Scientific Reports on August 8, 2019. Using a leading candidate in the development on new vaccines, Ag85b in conjunction with adjuvant Sbi-Ag85b, thermal stability of tested using a novel process called ensilication. Read More
A novel approach to using CRISPR: curing cystic fibrosis
Researchers are finding innovative ways to utilize CRISPR technology to permanently cure diseases, in this case, cystic fibrosis. A collaboration between the University of Trento in Italy and KU Leuven in Belgium, funded by Fondazione ricerca fibrosi cistica led to the publication of a new study in Nature Communications on August 7, 2019. Read More
New immunotherapy moves further into clinical testing with promising results
Success in international clinical trials leads to U.S. based research organizations beginning phase I/II clinical trials. If this form of immunotherapy is successful and deemed safe, then it could save the lives of liver cancer patients across the world. Read More
Visualizing big data in the life sciences gets an upgrade with new software
A new software developed by researchers at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) uses algorithms to reconstruct and scale data acquired by light-sheet microscopy that renders a supercomputer unnecessary. Light microscopy techniques provide extremely detailed information but result in terabytes of data which is nearly impossible for scientists to process. MDC researchers are helping make sense of this data. Read More
A bridge to the world around you: Your personal scientific brand
You of course know that your work and research in the life sciences matters. But how do you convince colleagues and potential employers of that? Read More
Structure-based vaccine design may help save the lives of infants and children
A new experimental vaccine, utilizing structure-based design, shows promise in a phase I clinical trial. The vaccine will protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of infectious disease deaths in infants. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin published findings on Aug 2, 2019 in Science stating that one dose elicited increases in RSV-neutralizing antibodies over several months. Read More
A bright new tactic in the fight against cardiovascular disease
A new system using reporter proteins has been developed by researchers at Carnegie, Johns Hopkins University, and the Mayo Clinic that uses high-throughput genetic and small-molecule screening, as well as whole-organism imaging to find new drugs for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. These results which provide insights into heart disease were published in Nature Communications on July 31, 2019. Read More
Building proteins from scratch – how AI is helping advance synthetic biology
A new de novo designed protein – degronLOCKR, is the first completely artificial protein switch that operates within cells. LOCKR (short for Latching, Orthogonal Cage/Key pRotein) design and initial practical applications were published in Nature on July 24, 2019. Research was conducted by research teams at UW Medicine Institute for Protein Design and the University of California San Francisco. Read More
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