Cell Biology
Machine learning model opens door to real-time detection of cell therapy contamination
Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Singapore site have developed a new way to detect adventitious microbial contamination in mesenchymal stromal cell cultures. By using machine learning to predict if a culture is contaminated in near real-time, the approach could enable testing to take place during the production of cell therapy products. Read More
Berkeley Lab offers CRAGE kit for genome engineering
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is offering a trial kit for its chassis-independent, recombinase-assisted, genome engineering (CRAGE) tool. Read More
Endosomal pH drives stemness in glioblastoma
A group of researchers has shown that endosomal pH drives stemness in glioblastoma. The group discovered that endosomal Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 9 is a novel driver of stem cell-like characteristics -- or stemness -- in glioblastoma by stabilizing multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, according to a recent paper published in PNAS Nexus. Read More
Newfound understanding of tissue migration can harness cancer spread
New research has uncovered mechanistic details in living tissue that explain how tissue exercises physical stresses to induce motion in vivo. The study, published in Nature Cell Biology on February 14, documents that the rear end of moving tissue plays a primary role in pushing tissue forward. This finding could be the basis for understanding organ development and the spread of cancer. Read More
Machine vision advances single-cell sequencing for small samples
The ability to sequence RNA in single cells has given scientists an unprecedented level of resolution in studying rare cell types. However, current approaches are designed to deal with a large number of cells, making it difficult to work with small samples. New research, published in Nature Methods on February 14, has described a technique using machine vision to detect cells and make single-cell RNA sequencing more efficient at a smaller scale. Read More
NETs-Th17 interaction offers new therapeutic target
Histones, a protein component of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), can directly stimulate T cells, specifically T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation, according to a recent Nature Communications research article. The stimulation of a specific adaptive immune cell subset imparts a noteworthy mechanism -- indicating a direct association between neutrophils, NETs, and T-cell autoimmunity -- and could be a new therapeutic target to treat autoimmune conditions. Read More
'Safe harbors' found for additions to human genome
A new way to find suitable places to make additions to the genome could give a boost to gene therapies. In a paper published January 24 in Cell Reports Methods, scientists describe an approach to find "safe harbors" in the genome that can receive new genes without causing unintended changes, such as promoting cancer. Read More
Pancreatic stellate cells promote cancer cell proliferation, tumor growth
Using optical imaging to study metabolic processes as they relate to tumor growth, researchers hope to better understand the tumor microenvironment and potential interventions. New research published on January 21 in Science Advances showed that pancreas cells co-cultured with pancreatic cancer cells in 3D organoids resulted in increased pancreatic cancer cell growth. Read More
Critical step identified in immune system response could lead to new treatments
New research has identified a crucial protein that controls the immune system's release of a key factor in fighting infections. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications on January 10, found that the MNDA protein is necessary for white blood cells to produce a type of interferon. This discovery could lead to new drugs to help fight infections or treat autoimmune conditions. Read More
New 'armed' CAR T cells can locally activate small-molecule cancer drugs
A new engineered CAR T platform, which turns cells into targeted “micropharmacies” with local activation of small-molecule prodrugs, has been shown to exhibit enhanced antitumor activity and can overcome a variety of current obstacles in conventional CAR T-cell therapy. The research, conducted by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center scientists, was published in Nature Chemical Biology on December 30, 2021. Read More
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BioProcess International (BPI) Conference
September 27-30
Boston, Massachusetts United States
Laboratory Products Association Annual Meeting
October 1-4
Scottsdale, Arizona United States
Cell & Gene Meeting on the Mesa
October 11-13
Carlsbad, California United States
IDWeek 2022
October 19-23
District of Columbia United States
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